Meet The ZOTAC GAMING GeForce GTX 1650 OC

In what's becoming a theme of the GTX 16-series, the GeForce GTX 1650 is once again a pure virtual launch, where NVIDIA is not going for any Founders Edition models and all cards are up to their add-in board partners. For today's review, we take a look at ZOTAC's GeForce GTX 1650 OC, a diminutive 2-slot single-fan card with reference base clockspeed and mildly overclocked boost clock. With a TDP of 75W, the card pulls all its power from the slot, with is typical for most GeForce GTX xx50 parts.

GeForce GTX 1650 Card Comparison
  GTX 1650
(Reference Specification)
ZOTAC GTX 1650 GAMING OC
Base Clock 1485MHz 1485MHz
Boost Clock 1665MHz 1695MHz
Memory Clock 8Gbps GDDR5 8Gbps GDDR5
VRAM 4GB 4GB
TDP 75W 75W
Length N/A 5.94"
Width N/A 2-Slot
Cooler Type N/A Open Air
Price $149 $149

At just under 6", the Zotac GTX 1650 OC is compact enough most builds. As the card pulls power only from the PCIe slot, it's a conventional fit for mITX and other SFF builds, or simply as a no-fuss drop-in replacement. In turn, the Zotac GTX 1650 OC's cooling solution is one they've used before with their other mini ITX cards, combining a 90mm fan and 'sunflower' heatsink. This also provides headroom for ZOTAC to put a modest boost increase of 30MHz.

 

The design/shroud and output situation is likewise similar. One DVI port, one HDMI 2.0b port, and one DisplayPort covers all bases, including potential HTPC use. Of course, partners can always decide on different configurations but the power/cost-sensitive entry-level range is essentially standardized. VirtualLink is naturally not included here for several reasons, and in perspective the 30W USB-C controller power budget for VirtualLink would be 40% of the overall 75W TDP.

For overclocking and tweaking, ZOTAC has their in-house Firestorm utility updated for Turing, including support for auto-OC scanning as part of Turing's GPU Boost 4 technology.

 
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  • Haawser - Thursday, May 9, 2019 - link

    No they can't. The higher tier RTX cards are not selling well because they're too expensive, and so is the 1650. You're some kind of delusional if you think Nvidia can charge whatever they want. Reply
  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, May 9, 2019 - link

    Spelling and grammar corrections (Only 2, good work):

    "This is where a lot of NVIDIA's previously touted "25% bitrate savings" for Turing come from."
    Should be "comes":
    "This is where a lot of NVIDIA's previously touted "25% bitrate savings" for Turing comes from."

    "Though the greater cooling requirements for a higher power card does means forgoing the small form factor."
    Extra s:
    "Though the greater cooling requirements for a higher power card does mean forgoing the small form factor."
    Reply
  • pcgpus - Saturday, October 5, 2019 - link

    interesting review, but GTX1650 is too exepnsive according to RX570 (and RX has better performance).

    If you want to watch more results check this link (results from few services in 3 resolutions and 21 games):

    https://warmbit.blogspot.com/2019/10/gtx1650-vs-gt...

    To translate just use Google translate from right side of site.
    Reply
  • GoSolarQuotes - Tuesday, February 25, 2020 - link

    https://www.gosolarquotes.com.au/ Reply
  • Rockfella.Killswitch - Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - link

    I purchased the Zotac 1650 OC for Rs. 12920 (USD 175.39) and later found out the 1650 super is 30% faster than 1650 and the a measly 3/4% slower than the 1660! Returned and got the 1650 Super Zotac. Reply
  • Rockfella.Killswitch - Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - link

    I purchased the Zotac 1650 OC for Rs. 12920 (USD 175.39) and later found out the 1650 super is 30% faster than 1650 and the a measly 3/4% slower than the 1660! Returned and got the 1650 Super Zotac for 192.75 USD (14199 INR)

    **
    Reply

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