In Win is one of the oldest manufacturers of PC cases and power supply units. The company was founded in 1985 and they recently celebrated their 30th anniversary. Unlike most other companies, In Win has remained almost exclusively focused on the design and marketing of PC cases and PSUs rather than trying to diversify into other areas of the market. Today In Win is offering one of the most comprehensive selections of cases, ranging from low-cost towers to entirely unique designs.

Introduction

It's been a while since we had a deep look at an In Win design. In Win supplied us with the 303, one of their most recent ATX tower cases. In Win promotes the 303 as a combination of a unique aesthetic with practical design and a reasonable price tag. On paper, the 303 does appear to be a very interesting product. We shall have a closer look at its quality and features, as well as assess its thermal performance in this review.

In Win 303
Motherboard Size ATX, Micro-ATX, Mini-ITX
Drive Bays External -
Internal 2 × 3.5"
2 × 2.5"
Cooling Front -
Rear 1 × 120 mm
Top 3 × 120 mm
HDD -
Bottom 3 × 120 mm
Radiator Support Front -
Rear Up to 120 mm
Top Up to 360 mm
Side -
Bottom -
I/O Port 2× USB 3.0, 2× USB 2.0, 1× Headphone, 1× Mic
Power Supply Size ATX
Clearances HSF 160 mm
PSU 240 mm
GPU 350 mm
Dimensions 500 mm × 215 mm × 480 mm
19.69 in × 8.46 in × 18.9 in
Prominent Features · Exquisitely Modest Aesthetic Design
· Radiant Luminosity
· Accelerated Tool-less Design
· User Friendly Dust Filter
· Versatile Cooling Options
Price $92.25

Packaging & Bundle

We received one of the very first samples of the 303 and In Win did not have the retail package ready at the time, so we cannot comment on it. We did receive the full retail bundle though and it was unsurprisingly basic. The company supplies only a typical manual, the required mounting hardware, support braces for the heavy expansion cards and ten cable ties.

The Exterior of the In Win 303
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  • Wwhat - Sunday, October 30, 2016 - link

    Perhaps you can remove that logo and replace it with a personal touch.
    But I also don't like that color, ruins the thing you could have achieved with the tempered glass, could have looked so much fancier. Looks like it is more geared to the Korean market or something.
    Reply
  • npz - Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - link

    You should test your testing methodology to include both stock configuration--in this case, no fans--and optimal configuration i.e. with fans and with water cooling, since that's what is was made for. I'm pretty sure no one is going to run it fanless.

    I took at look at this case at the store and the first thing I noticed was that it was very heavy. I didn't know that the logo and ports lit up though, so it's good you showed that.
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - link

    At this point I blame the case OEMs for sending cases like this in for review. You and I aren't the only people who've raised the issue over the years in comments; but E. Fylladitakis appears uninterested in changing his testing methodology to make it not drag cases whose design is built around ventilation generated by other components fans (eg the radiator in this case, or the cpu cooler and GPU blower in compact mITX cases) instead of fans bundled in with the case itself. Reply
  • Voldenuit - Thursday, October 13, 2016 - link

    Exactly, this case is not and never was intended to be a passive case, and testing it as such is ridiculous.

    It would be akin to testing a thermalright cooler with no fans attached, since Tr doesn't ship fans with their coolers. Or testing a 240mm rad with no fans or water pump attached.

    Right now, this review tells us NOTHING about how the 303 would fare as a normal or water-cooled case. For all we know, it could be excellent, or it could have some weird airflow quirk that kills its thermal performance in the real world.
    Reply
  • Manch - Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - link

    Looks like a nice sturdy & cheap case.

    Oh has anyone noticed that DT is alive again? I know a lot of us are old DT readers before it went tits up.
    Reply
  • Reflex - Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - link

    And yet its worse than before, mixing off base articles now with obvious paid filler content like a bunch of fake supplements. Reply
  • Manch - Thursday, October 13, 2016 - link

    I was at work so I didn't get a chance to look much at it. I was looking for a site on my favorites and saw it was still saved so I clicked just to see if the site was up. To my surprise there were new articles. Then I read them. Holy fricken run on sentence. Every article was in ESL or ETL. Reply
  • Manch - Thursday, October 13, 2016 - link

    need edit!!! Then I read them when I got home. Reply
  • peconi - Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - link

    I saw the black version of this case @ local Micro Center here in Columbus, Ohio. Decided to buy it yesterday actually. It is absolutely awesome, and it was just $84! Reply
  • BrokenCrayons - Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - link

    I'd like to see future reviews focus on mATX and smaller designs. These larger cases are uncommon outliers rather than mainstream so I don't think they're very relevant to most system builders and personal computer owners in the present day. Reply

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