Samsung quietly added its 4 TB 850 EVO SSD model to the product to the lineup back in May (according to its own datasheet) without making any formal announcements. Earlier this month the company lifted the embargo on reviews of the product (you can read ours here) and began to ship the high-capacity SSD to its partners. By now, all the major retailers already either have the product in stock, or are taking pre-orders with ETA about a week from today, at a US MSRP of $1499.

The Samsung SSD 850 EVO 4 TB (MZ-75E4T0) comes in a 2.5”/7 mm form-factor with SATA interface and is based on the company’s TLC V-NAND memory (3D, 32-layers). The 850 EVO 4 TB drive is based on the MHX controller and is equipped with 4 GB of LPDDR3 cache (previously we were told we knew about the MHX ASIC supported 2GB max, which is interesting). Like the rest members of the 850 EVO family, the 4 TB model fully supports 256-bit full disk encryption that is compatible with the TCG/Opal 2.0 and IEEE1667 specifications, which is important for workstation users.

Samsung SSD 850 EVO Specifications
Capacity 120 GB 250 GB 500 GB 1 TB 2 TB 4 TB
Controller MGX MEX MHX
NAND Samsung 32-layer 128 Gbit TLC V-NAND
DRAM 256 MB 512 MB 1 GB 2 GB 4 GB
Sequential Read 540 MB/s
Sequential Write 520 MB/s
4KB Random Read 94K IOPS 97K IOPS 98K IOPS
4KB Random Write 88K IOPS 88K IOPS 90K IOPS
DevSleep Power  2 mW 2 mW 2 mW 4 mW 5 mW 10 mW
Slumber Power  50mW 60mW unknown
Active Power (Read/Write) Max 3.7W / 4.4W 3.7W / 4.7W 3.1W / 3.6W
Encryption AES-256, TCG Opal 2.0, IEEE-1667 (eDrive)
Endurance 75 TB 150 TB 300 TB
Warranty Five years

As for performance, the Samsung 850 EVO 4 TB drive resembles other higher-end models in the 850 EVO family. The manufacturer declares maximum sequential read speed of 540 MB/s as well as maximum sequential write speed of 520 MB/s for the SSD. As for random performance, the drive delivers a top speed of 98,000/90,000 4K random read/write IOPS. Maximum power consumption of the drive is 3.1 W/3.6 W during active read/write operations, which is also in line with the rest of the high-end 850 EVO SSDs.

Right now, virtually all the biggest retailers in the world already have the Samsung 850 EVO 4 TB in stock, or, at least, list the drive and take pre-orders. We could say that the highest-capacity consumer-class SSD is now widely available, however, we should note that in many stores the first batch was sold out immediately and some only have several units left.

Samsung SSD 850 EVO 4 TB (MZ-75E4T0B) Availability
As of 7/22 9am
Retailer Country Local Price Price in USD In Stock
Amazon U.S. $1,499 $1,499 July 31, 2016
B&H Photo Video U.S. $1,499 $1,499 Ships in 7-10 days
CDW U.S. $1,648 $1,648 Yes
Fry's Electronics U.S. $1,499 $1,499 August 1, 2016
Newegg U.S. $1,499 $1,499 July 31, 2016
NCIX Canada CAD $1,920 $1,468 Ships in 1-2 weeks
 
Amazon UK U.K. £1,200 $1,570 July 30, 2016
Overclockers UK U.K. £1,200 $1,570 6 in stock
Scan U.K. £1,283 $1,680 Yes
 
Amazon DE Germany €1,299 $1,413 1 in stock
Amazon ES Spain €1,605 $1,768 Yes
Amazon FR France €1,502 $1,654 6 in stock
Alternate Austria €1,399 $1,541 July 28, 2016
BA Computer Austria €1,391 $1,532 July 29, 2016
Bora Computer Germany €1,379 $1,519 5 in stock
CaseKing Germany €1,480 $1,630 Yes
 
CineMagic Denmark 10,782 kr $1,596 Yes
Komplett Sweden 13,799 kr $1,598 Incoming
Misco Sweden 11,382 kr $1,318 Yes

The Samsung EVO SSD with 4 TB capacity has MSRP of $1,499 in the US, and the high price indicates that this remains a prosumer play at this point. At $1,499, the price is over two times higher than the 2 TB 850 EVO model ($675.76 at Newegg), indicating a higher cost per GB in exchange for density. Ultimately the product will likely find its buyer among those who need a large amount of solid-state storage (in 2.5"/7mm form-factor).

Other Options, Mainly for Enterprise

Typically SSDs of such capacity are designed for servers and datacenters and come with professional grade features which makes them even more expensive. For example, the SanDisk Optimus Max 4 TB (SAS) is available for $2,685 at Amazon and for $2,718 at Ebay. Likewise, Samsung’s own enterprise-grade PM863 3.84 TB SSD (SATA) has suggested price of $2,200, whereas its faster PM1633 3.84 TB (SAS) brother is sold for $3,092. Moreover, if you go to companies like Fixstars or Foremay, they build special-purpose SSDs for various non-PC applications. These products typically aren't even quoted for pricing, because they can feature different configurations and the order quantity affects the pricing, along with any support deal.

Nonetheless, when it comes to performance, capacity, endurance and price, the sky is the limit for solid-state storage. Multiple companies (including Samsung and Fixstars) now offer 2.5” SSDs with over 10 TB capacity and there are specialized solutions (such as those from HPE) that can easily cost $10,000 and north. In short, $1,499 may not be that expensive for a consumer drive.

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  • Impulses - Monday, July 25, 2016 - link

    Not if you go by MSRP. All the drives seem to fall well under MSRP within a few months. Reply
  • lilmoe - Thursday, July 28, 2016 - link

    The 850 EVO is NOT a new drive. New capacities don't warrant zero hour. Reply
  • Impulses - Monday, July 25, 2016 - link

    I'm not sure you understand what price fixing means, typically it requires two parties to be complicit tho, which doesn't seem to be what you're implying or something Samsung could do by their lonesome.

    It's new, it's a TotL product, and it has little competition, the price could actually be higher per GB and it'd probably still sell within the niches it's meant to. Just because it's an EVO doesn't mean it's strictly a mass consumer product.

    I'm sure many pros in content creation could use 4TB SSD in a workstation, or several of them, it's price is barely the cost of a new lens/camera body/etc. If there were three other SSD manufacturers making equally good 4TB SSD and they were all this price then you could cry price fixing...

    Or if Samsung was the only NAND supplier, but they're not.
    Reply
  • lilmoe - Thursday, July 28, 2016 - link

    "which doesn't seem to be what you're implying or something Samsung could do by their lonesome".

    RCD spotted. (reading comprehension disorder). Reread.

    "If they have the money, the should pay up." Great logic there buddy. Hope your paycheck is big enough for all your efforts.

    Expensive pro equipment (whether obviously overpriced or not) is used by pros to MAKE money. In simple English, shit pays for itself. This, however, is STORAGE, FFS.
    Reply
  • LordanSS - Friday, July 22, 2016 - link

    I'll buy a bunch of these for a home NAS, say 6-8 drives...

    ...the day I win big in a lottery or something. Otherwise, I'll keep dreaming.
    Reply
  • JKJK - Friday, July 22, 2016 - link

    NB! MISCO price is without VAT. Reply
  • Kjella - Saturday, July 23, 2016 - link

    Yeah also wondered about that, +25% if you want to buy it as a consumer... so more like $1648 Reply
  • extide - Saturday, July 23, 2016 - link

    I'm pretty sure these use the new 3-rd gen 48-layer 3D NAND from Samsung, not the 2-gen 32-layer stuff. Reply
  • Motion2082 - Saturday, September 3, 2016 - link

    Samsung are greedy motherf#%^ckers

    Don't buy these overprices chips no matter the temptation
    Reply

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